Home Forums Everything about the Tricopter V4 Flying tips for beginners

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  • #13878
    wynnsquad
    Participant

    Hi all,

    Many of you have probably seen this clip from flite test but I just wanted to share it again here. I’ve been trying to discipline myself to follow the flying progression they present in this episode and I can say that I believe it has been super effective in helping me become a better pilot with fewer crashes in the process. I thought this could be a place for people to post additional flying tips for beginners. My tip is to watch this video and to stick to their suggestions for the first several flights!

    #14058
    Agent CAL
    Participant

    Yeah, I watched that video too a while ago. I guess I already learned the basics on my Nano QX, but I can definitely see how that would be useful for beginners.

    #14131
    Agent CAL
    Participant

    Another thing is even though it says not to use auto level, if you’ve never flown before, I’d flip on the auto level, so you can take off and stuff. Then you could try without it. The recommended KK2 settings are very soft, and pretty easy, but still. Fly around in auto level for fun, but FPV and aerial video skyrockets in manual mode, it gives you much more control, and everything is smoother. Definitely once you get used to the tricopter flip into manual and experiment.

    #14260
    Aaron
    Participant

    I still cant get the tri to lift off straight and level with auto level on. I havent gunned it yet, just had it almost off the ground and I see it wants to tip over.
    I have been following the manual for the KK2.1 board even though I am using the KKmini. Im following Davids vids…
    Motors are set up right, Acc calibaration was done on a perfectly level surface, CG is right, the board is on level
    Any advice, I dont want to brake the tri before I even start

    #14262
    LeoTheHuman
    Participant

    Problem with autolevel is that it’s much harder to learn flying without it if you have flown with it. It’s much easier to start without it, than learning to abandon it. It’s not harder to fly without autolevel, it’s just very-very different skill.
    I don’t really like how they teach you to take off. That will probably lead to a lot of crashes for people who can’t hover yet. I would suggest a different tactics. Find a place where you can slide a little bit, but the surface will resist it slightly. That might be short grass or just dirt (not too dry, though). Start adding a bit of throttle at a time. Just remember to level the thing after at least one landing gear is off the ground and don’t add more power while it’s not level. If at least one landing gear is still on the ground after leveling, add a tiny bit more power and level again. If not, congratulations, you took off without autolevel and your precious machine is still in one piece and close to the ground in stable hover. This is how they usually teach you to fly a real helicopter. (: Later, when you learn to level from any orientation in the sky, you’ll be able to take off just adding a lot of throttle from the start, but you shouldn’t learn this way if you don’t want to crash a few times. The height you’re flying at should feel comfortable to cut the throttle right away and you can’t guarantee that if you jumpstart knowing nothing about the flight characteristics of your craft.

    #14268
    Agent CAL
    Participant

    In the video they said to punch off the ground, right? The last thing you want to do is bob around in the “dirty” air 6 inches off the ground, it’s an all or nothing type of thing. Also the KK2 board might flip the tricopter if it’s stuck on the ground, since it has to get its bearings in the air. There’s probably a happy medium, but to beginners don’t try to coax the copter on the ground, that often ends in a flip.

    You know, I never thought of the auto level thing being a hinderance, I flew with the Nano QX so it’s all I ever knew. I guess if you have really dumbed down controls you could probably do it. But if you crash multiple times (it might be easier for some than others) I’d recommend auto level to help you along, and then use manual mode as soon as possible. Not everyone is pre-versed in throttle management when they first fly a multi rotor. I know I probably would have crashed a lot had I flown a multi rotor the first time without auto level, since I’d never had any experience.

    Another thing to mention is David’s Tricopter settings are really easy and soft, so it’s not that hard to learn manual mode. Auto level will take away another complication to worry about. I still recommend it for your first flight, get some bearings and then switch it on and off in flight to try and ease your way out of it, that works for me.

    #14269
    Agent CAL
    Participant

    @Aaron Definitely try and break free from the ground when you take off, all multi rotors will do that if you try and ease the power. I’m not saying you can’t, but you’d have to be experienced to keep it level. Give more power, the copter will quickly be in the air, then start hovering there. Anywhere you look that’s how people take off, the reason is the prop wash bouncing off the ground rebuffs the copter, making it unstable.

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