Home Forums Everything about the Mini Tricopter How to test ESCs and Motors

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  LarryTru 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #32909

    LarryTru
    Participant

    Hello,

    In all the build videos I’ve watched, David recommends testing the motors and ESCs during build. Presumably to sniff out defective parts and incorrect wiring earlier rather than later.

    However, I’m building my first Mini Tricopter, first multi-rotor aircraft for that matter, and I am not sure how to do that. One way I can think of is to basically fire up the FC on the bench, make some temporary connections and use the triflight configurator to runs the tests.

    Is there an easier way?

    Thanks,

    Larry

    #32910

    Terje
    Moderator

    Use a servo tester to control the ESC to take the FC out of the equation.

    #32913

    meborc
    Participant

    You can also just plug your ESC straight to the throttle channel on your receiver. Make sure you have removed the propellers from motors beforehand. This way you can easily test the direction of the motor before fixing the heat-shrink on it.

    #32915

    sscott
    Participant

    I second @meborc‘s advice.

    #32918

    Terje
    Moderator

    Using a receiver to test the ESCs introduces the possibility to lets say plug the ESC into the rudder channel (some radios have designated channels for throttle, rudder, elevator and aileron would you believe it). Plugging the ESC into any other channel than throttle will give it a PWM signal of 1500us (mid point) and the ESC/motor won’t run since it has been powered on with a PWM signal higher than 1000us. That is, you introduce multiple failure points if using a receiver (channel must be right, receiver must be setup correctly, receiver must be bound correctly, receiver must be powered correctly.

    With a servo tester, you first test the servo tester with a servo to make sure it works, then test the ESC 🙂

    #32922

    meborc
    Participant

    Terje is correct of course. The thing is I never had a dedicated servo tester, so I have always used my receiver.

    You can use a combination of the tail servo and receiver to see if radio link is up and that you are using a correct (throttle) channel. Then plug ESC to the receiver to test motor direction.

    Owning a servo tester is very useful, but when you don’t have one at hand you should be able to utilize tools you have 🙂

    #32925

    LarryTru
    Participant

    Thanks everyone!

    I’ll probably use a receiver right now (with terje’s cautions in mind) and put “servo tester on my wish list for later.

    Larry

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